Physics of Computer Chips – Computerphile

Physics of Computer Chips – Computerphile

You can’t beat physics. Why the chip manufacturers are heading for a wall. We asked nano-scientist Phil Moriarty Professor of Physics in the School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham

EXTRA BITS: https://youtu.be/gLF9z4dGKnw
Teaching Physics in Ethiopia: https://youtu.be/-_Gv9C56heM
Is it the end for Moore’s Law: https://youtu.be/X8v1BB0UaDs
Password Cracking: https://youtu.be/7U-RbOKanYs
Gamer’s Paradise: https://youtu.be/HZzdXR0bV8o

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This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley.

Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer

Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran’s Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com

50 Comments

  1. Roger Barraud on October 16, 2019 at 3:30 pm

    Great craic, but I prefer the one where Jen drops The Internet 😉



  2. Kenichi Mori on October 16, 2019 at 3:31 pm

    d(^^)



  3. Andrew Lankford on October 16, 2019 at 3:31 pm

    Every time Prof Moriarty speaks, I keep expecting him to start talking about the health benefits of eating leeks.



  4. John M. on October 16, 2019 at 3:32 pm

    Will we see a price reset to classical computing? If the system is near its limits based on current chip processes, will there be the need to increase chip size, thus increasing cost/price?



  5. David Wilkie on October 16, 2019 at 3:34 pm

    Eternity-now is the reciprocating e-Pi-i timing spacing "Computing Driver", and ultimate, temporally-substantiated modular substrate.., and maybe the actual limit of calculations is the Observable Universe, for Gaia with what is available to us if the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy guessed right..

    It’s all "wave mechanics" of the Universal Holographic Image projection resonance "particle of particles".., to frame the picture.



  6. Roger Barraud on October 16, 2019 at 3:34 pm

    2019 update: 5nm in the works, 7nm in production (AMD Ryzen 3000 series, e.g.)



  7. Aaron Risley on October 16, 2019 at 3:39 pm

    I worked in a research dept, they had great ideas…



  8. Jamie Pull That Up on October 16, 2019 at 3:40 pm

    He sounds like Marcus McCloud.



  9. mastercheif1989 on October 16, 2019 at 3:42 pm

    Watch in 20 years some kid will be watching cat videos on his quantum computer cellphone with 100 trillion gigs of memory while sitting on the toilet.



  10. Márk Stefán on October 16, 2019 at 3:43 pm

    I’m at 7:14 and have to stop here. To take a break. So much information!



  11. Aaron B. on October 16, 2019 at 3:44 pm

    Come to commercial photonics, photolith is not running out of steam 😉



  12. Paul Bell on October 16, 2019 at 3:45 pm

    Watching this in 2019, they are now manufacturing 7nm microprocessors, how things move on.



  13. Łukasz Formela on October 16, 2019 at 3:45 pm

    11:35 and futher:

    Shouldn’t it be integrated whole? English is not my primary lang.



  14. Aonoymous Andy on October 16, 2019 at 3:46 pm

    this is great info, since I come from a physical science background this shows the application of what I learned, wish they had a class on the physics of computers



  15. Liberty Prime on October 16, 2019 at 3:48 pm

    14nm++++++++++++



  16. Woody Woodlstein on October 16, 2019 at 3:49 pm

    Awe what a great teacher right here.



  17. Thomas Alexander on October 16, 2019 at 3:51 pm

    Why does the cameraman sound like Prof. Brian Cox?



  18. Woody Woodlstein on October 16, 2019 at 3:51 pm

    If i knew I could do the math I’d apply every year to be in his class. And Brailsford.



  19. Chris Rickey on October 16, 2019 at 3:52 pm

    Photo or electron beam lithography processes seem as though they could present issues passing light beams through small adjacent slits on the masks to produce high resolution formations using sharp focused beams. How are they avoiding wave shaped interference patterns, such as are produced in the double slit experiment? My understanding of both these processes and the double slit experiment are about as novice and rudimentary as this video. If anyone having more knowledge and understanding on this matter may be so kind as to enlighten me on why this is or is not a limitation to these processes, both your time and effort to respond is greatly appreciated. Thanks



  20. Jamaa L on October 16, 2019 at 3:54 pm

    I subscribed twice



  21. C SMITH on October 16, 2019 at 3:54 pm

    I usually just understand 25% of these talks but just love this channel and will keep coiming back to it again and again. Thank you for this!



  22. David Spicer on October 16, 2019 at 3:55 pm

    1 word "cocaine"



  23. Eddie Mattia on October 16, 2019 at 3:56 pm

    Amazing video! I have a question about Professor Moriarty’s explanation of how the semiconductor industry is able to create such precise patterns on transistors. When the two offset masks are placed over the silicon wafer and light is shown, how is it that the light is able to deterministically etch a pattern? Why would it not behave like a wave/particle in the double slit experiment and defract into a probabilistic wave pattern on the wafer?



  24. Ryan Roberson on October 16, 2019 at 3:57 pm

    how might one create a gate, with 3 inputs, that ensures conservation, while letting the second output be the XOR of the first two inputs?



  25. Proxy on October 16, 2019 at 3:58 pm

    instead of having to face the rpoblems of making smaller circuits… why not stay at 14-7 nm and just make stuff bigger again? like not the distance between wires and such, but like the circuit size…



  26. pacmandandan on October 16, 2019 at 3:59 pm

    Ha! It’s Chris O’ Dowd from the IT Crowd!



  27. Flurt on October 16, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    Finally, i saw the English camera man.



  28. Señor Poodles on October 16, 2019 at 4:02 pm

    At 9:10, what does the offsetting of the masks accomplish?



  29. Josías Alvarado on October 16, 2019 at 4:02 pm

    Does Professor Moriarty have any published books written by him? I’d love to check that out.



  30. Mattshu on October 16, 2019 at 4:03 pm

    Even though it’s microscopic, the offset mask technique made my OCD flame up. Which direction do you offset? Who decides that? What if the mask goes out of bounds? My heart asks for eternity



  31. j. rodman on October 16, 2019 at 4:05 pm

    This gentleman is incredible.



  32. Aaron Risley on October 16, 2019 at 4:05 pm

    He’s pretty proud of himself



  33. David Wilkie on October 16, 2019 at 4:09 pm

    Asimov – Quantum Chemistry of Positronic brains?



  34. Philip Sheard on October 16, 2019 at 4:11 pm

    "You do not understand quantum physics, you get used to it". Exactly.



  35. Robert Galletta on October 16, 2019 at 4:14 pm

    insulation. you never really had to apply much in the way of insulation in the making of IC on CHIP. Now ya do! a fe carbon atoms or argon atoms, could shield quantum effects to a minimum.



  36. chbrules on October 16, 2019 at 4:14 pm

    The next stage is going to be optical computing. We will be operating in the THz range, because we will no longer have to wait around for transistor states to switch.



  37. Kyle Shovan on October 16, 2019 at 4:14 pm

    Can you use xray lithography in order to make the smaller structures? That would keep the speed of traditional methods. Why limit to the ultraviolet range?



  38. Andrew Lankford on October 16, 2019 at 4:15 pm

    I question whether it’s verifiably true that hair grows at a nanometer per second. If a hair cell is about 10 microns, then you would think that hair grows as hair cells branch off from a hair cell follicle, and that’s probably happens periodically but not gradually.



  39. ö. . , on October 16, 2019 at 4:18 pm

    Oh no, the video stopped at the most interesting part.



  40. Subwayd00d on October 16, 2019 at 4:19 pm

    viiiiiiiiiiiiiirtuuuuuuuuuuuuuuueeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee



  41. scowell on October 16, 2019 at 4:20 pm

    I believe there’s both positive and negative photo-resist. Love Moriarty! He’s the man.



  42. marshalcraft on October 16, 2019 at 4:20 pm

    We need to move past this age of Gold shrine shaman intel and amd computer chip labs. Small shops could be producing 300 nm chips easily.



  43. Antoniija Larsson on October 16, 2019 at 4:21 pm

    His accent is very strong and hard to understand. Sounds like a sheep farmer from Ireland or Scotland



  44. Luky0805 on October 16, 2019 at 4:23 pm

    You could see atom is 1955?!?!?!??!?!??!!!! I thought it was new discovery like 2018 or 2019… wow.



  45. unisonsports3 on October 16, 2019 at 4:24 pm

    Its becasue they ARE waves… the "particle" is a construct of a biological mind.



  46. __ on October 16, 2019 at 4:25 pm

    is there a part 2 because it feels incomplete



  47. Brian Parker on October 16, 2019 at 4:25 pm

    How on earth do you engineer a tip atomically sharp? Great vid!



  48. Joel Amoako on October 16, 2019 at 4:25 pm

    best video i’m seen on computer chips



  49. NethTech on October 16, 2019 at 4:26 pm

    Watching this on a phone with a snapdragon 845 based on a 10nm process. Interesting to hear him talk about pushing the limits to get to 13.5 and here we’re are just a couple years later at 10nm



  50. AnteConfig on October 16, 2019 at 4:27 pm

    I swear every time a computerphile video ends, when I hear those beeps, I start singing "Askepios" by the Mars Volta.
    I love it.
    At the end of each video I literally start singing "I’ll be there waiting…" and start asking myself "damn what song is that?"