Computing Limit – Computerphile

Computing Limit – Computerphile

Just how far can we go with processing speed? Physicist Professor Phil Moriarty talks about the hard limits of computing.

Technical physics (aside) video: https://youtu.be/mBdCE5hOexM

https://www.facebook.com/computerphile

This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley.

Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: https://bit.ly/nottscomputer

Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran’s Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com

50 Comments

  1. John_Smith Chiropractor on December 23, 2019 at 7:37 pm

    I want to become a expert in harry potter for some reason..



  2. チγƒ₯imoc on December 23, 2019 at 7:38 pm

    I love inforMeHtion



  3. FA Garfield on December 23, 2019 at 7:38 pm

    Discover Computing from the guidance of the Quran by Dr Zaid Kasim Ghazzawi .😊



  4. Dracarius Duxtorm on December 23, 2019 at 7:39 pm

    This is awesome



  5. SaintCergue on December 23, 2019 at 7:40 pm

    Thanks for the memorable uncertainty principle demonstration. It also works in human communication: the attention span of your audience defines the complexity of the message you can convey.



  6. DarkWarrior on December 23, 2019 at 7:41 pm

    What a self obsessed fanny.



  7. Chris Carter on December 23, 2019 at 7:43 pm

    Video on Fredkin gates…then a video on quantum gates.



  8. Fenrir6995 on December 23, 2019 at 7:44 pm

    Is no one really gonna comment on the fact that we got an Irish professor named Moriarty LOL?!!!



  9. Caio Borges Melo on December 23, 2019 at 7:47 pm

    I want to change the way I say information to the way this guy does.



  10. Danny BRITZMAN on December 23, 2019 at 7:48 pm

    Whoa that’s ridiculously cool



  11. Zepher Tensho on December 23, 2019 at 7:48 pm

    Seeing this guy on Computerphile is so surreal after seeing him in Armored Skeptic’s "Answers for SJWs"



  12. Finian Blackett on December 23, 2019 at 7:50 pm

    There are quite a few theoretical ways to not only break through most physical limits of computation but also to solve uncomputable functions such as the halting problem or the Busy Beaver function



  13. Carvin0 on December 23, 2019 at 7:50 pm

    Not exactly sure what "energy" dissipation corresponds to "information loss". I can conceive a perfect CMOS AND that dumps stored charge on internal nodes to ground through ideal zero resistance "on" transistors at logic transitions. That is information loss without energy dissipation. I think the concept of "entropy" is used differently in physics/thermodynamics and information theory and the two usages are muddled here.



  14. babyplaze on December 23, 2019 at 7:50 pm

    Wow, I got goosebumps at the end of the video when you explain how far away we actually are from the computational limit.



  15. elmer on December 23, 2019 at 7:53 pm

    Nice (or accidental?) Erotomania reference? πŸ˜€



  16. Sean Spartan on December 23, 2019 at 7:53 pm

    Mathematically speaking, this reminds me of inverse functions. The system is reversible if every final position can be paired with at most one initial condition. Which in math terms is like saying the mapping from the initial condition set to the final condition set must be injective (i.e. must be a monomorphism).



  17. Csaba BenΓ‘k on December 23, 2019 at 7:55 pm

    13:24 AMD, Cray to build 1.5 exaFlop "Frontier" supercomputer for Oak Ridge National Lab, it arrives at the lab in 2021.
    NICE



  18. Ryan Gannon on December 23, 2019 at 7:56 pm

    It’s not just me, there’s something weirdly sexy about this video, right?



  19. Grown ups on December 23, 2019 at 7:56 pm

    If i dont code it i cant understand it…….Seems like einstines statement "If you cant explain it in simple way means you have not understood it "



  20. Robert Hocker on December 23, 2019 at 7:56 pm

    I have observed the most efficient computer would be a light beam computer; or, an atomic computer utilizing trittium that is utilized in watches.



  21. daniel marcotte on December 23, 2019 at 7:58 pm

    epiphone les paul elitist in the background



  22. Tom Johnson on December 23, 2019 at 7:58 pm

    He’s quite an annoying man.

    PS look at the guitar hidden in plane sight in his office, just so we all know what a free spirit he is.



  23. Braden Eliason on December 23, 2019 at 7:58 pm

    "THERE IS AS YET INSUFFICIENT DATA FOR A MEANINGFUL ANSWER."



  24. Peter Friedman on December 23, 2019 at 7:59 pm

    This guy’s infinite enthusiasm and unbounded love for his subject matter is self-evidently just way off the charts. See what I did there? Infinite and unbounded? Off the charts? Those things are just as true in terms of what he’s talking about as they are of how passionately he tries to get things accross It’s just that he does it all so much more spontaeously and infectiously than I ever could. Simply awesome.



  25. myantispambox on December 23, 2019 at 8:00 pm

    Moore’s Law forever!



  26. Prashanth Kurella on December 23, 2019 at 8:01 pm

    Thats no NAND gate its an AND gate



  27. Petr Gladkikh on December 23, 2019 at 8:02 pm

    Gates that use field-effect transistors consume energy only when switching. How that energy loss applies in this case?



  28. noodled on December 23, 2019 at 8:05 pm

    Thats why you GO BEYOND. There’s always improvements to be made, nothing is ever perfect.



  29. Leif Messinger on December 23, 2019 at 8:05 pm

    Do we have exoflops now?



  30. Miko Deth2018 on December 23, 2019 at 8:08 pm

    ok can he play smoke on the water or metallica Wherver i may roam that be great hahaha



  31. Petr Gladkikh on December 23, 2019 at 8:09 pm

    13:10 – 10 to 15, or 10e50? We already have 15 operations per second πŸ™‚



  32. Yuheng XIE on December 23, 2019 at 8:09 pm

    "THE DEATH OF EXPERTISE"



  33. raglanheuser on December 23, 2019 at 8:10 pm

    can’t find ElectricEngineeringPhile. does anyone have the youtube link?



  34. Tobias Triesch on December 23, 2019 at 8:15 pm

    I really enjoyed this one. Cheers!



  35. meh nah on December 23, 2019 at 8:16 pm

    Ointments



  36. asdfghyter on December 23, 2019 at 8:18 pm

    This is really really cool! Computation without energy loss would be amazing!



  37. Will Power on December 23, 2019 at 8:21 pm

    I thought this was gonna be about how computers compute mathematical limits



  38. K McCormack on December 23, 2019 at 8:21 pm

    I have been eating up videos from this channel. Not a clue for most of it but I love it, cheers πŸ™‚



  39. Woody Woodlstein on December 23, 2019 at 8:22 pm

    Love this man. Great teacher. Wish I could attend.



  40. Robin Wells on December 23, 2019 at 8:22 pm

    This man has a truly awesome gift for information transfer! I envy his students.



  41. Mattias Festin on December 23, 2019 at 8:23 pm

    Does this only apply to a theoretical quantum computer with qbits? Or is it only a theoretical classical computer?



  42. Nikolay Ivankov on December 23, 2019 at 8:24 pm

    Dear Computerphie team. I have added accurate English captions as well as Russian captions about a year ago. Could you please review and perhaps publish them, should you be satisfied. Thank you!



  43. Mark Boekraad on December 23, 2019 at 8:27 pm

    Just having a cleaning time at home but these matters never get dull really πŸ˜€



  44. Angel Carvajal on December 23, 2019 at 8:27 pm

    Ill solve:
    The computing speed limt
    The computing lightspeed
    The computing c
    Use C!!!!



  45. Demetrius Botyuk on December 23, 2019 at 8:29 pm

    Perfect fredken gates can exist with superconductors. No resistance, no energy loss to heat, no information loss



  46. steppin808 on December 23, 2019 at 8:30 pm

    My upvote lost most of the information in how much I enjoyed this talk…



  47. Mastering everything on December 23, 2019 at 8:30 pm

    But would 10^50 Flops be enough to simulate a universe πŸ€”?



  48. f4z0 on December 23, 2019 at 8:30 pm

    But can it run crysis?

    Sorry I had to. Imagine gaming in a dual blackhole Intel cpu.



  49. Kenichi Mori on December 23, 2019 at 8:30 pm

    Computer unlimits



  50. Joshua Scholar on December 23, 2019 at 8:31 pm

    But if the limit is for consecutive operations, well, we ran up against engineering limits for those a long time ago and the super computers he mentioned have limits that are based on assuming that a large number of instructions can go on in parallel without communication between them.