Quantum computing is the future… eventually | Jason Ball | TEDxOIST

Quantum computing is the future… eventually | Jason Ball | TEDxOIST

Jason Ball is a PhD student in quantum information science, a former teacher, and the father of a budding young scientist, Jason has a passion for teaching physics. Although many people are intimidated by physics, Jason believes that everyone is capable of understanding the guiding physical principles of our world, including quantum mechanics. Jason’s primary research interests at OIST lie in developing technologies to protect and transfer quantum information, and he has also taken up quantum programming as a hobby. When he’s not in the lab or the classroom, Jason can be found spending time with his family or painting miniatures. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx Jason Ball is a PhD student in quantum information science, a former teacher, and the father of a budding young scientist, Jason has a passion for teaching physics. Although many people are intimidated by physics, Jason believes that everyone is capable of understanding the guiding physical principles of our world, including quantum mechanics. Jason’s primary research interests at OIST lie in developing technologies to protect and transfer quantum information, and he has also taken up quantum programming as a hobby. When he’s not in the lab or the classroom, Jason can be found spending time with his family or painting miniatures. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

31 Comments

  1. worldwin official on January 7, 2020 at 8:07 pm

    My question it’s possible we find time particles and dark energy and dark matter with quantum computing



  2. Eastern Turki on January 7, 2020 at 8:07 pm

    How about the material to build quatum computer was found in East Turkistan?
    Hello from E.T. — 💙💜East Turkistan💙💜



  3. jo ho on January 7, 2020 at 8:09 pm

    I’m in a superstate. I understand it and at the same time I don’t 😀



  4. Venkatesh babu on January 7, 2020 at 8:10 pm

    They are even faster than distributed computing and network computing.



  5. Inquisitour M29 on January 7, 2020 at 8:14 pm

    This is 2050 and we still don’t have the Quantum Computer!
    Eventually..



  6. Sow B on January 7, 2020 at 8:15 pm

    I don’t understand … if you have to check if the quantum computer gave you the right answer that means you already had the right answer at the time you asked the question, and if you already had the right answer that means you already calculated it elsewhere… and if you already calculated elsewhere it then why do you need a quantum computer at all??

    After all, I assume the value of a quantum computer will only come for the unsolvable problems… but having to check each answer doesn’t sound very efficient…



  7. antonio bortoni on January 7, 2020 at 8:21 pm

    If you understand Quantum computing your mind becomes Quantum??
    Joking



  8. Prafull More on January 7, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Quantum is eternal



  9. Mike Hunt on January 7, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Quantum Computers seem more like an ASIC. I think they won’t overtake regular computers but will compliment them. I mean, all the data from the Quantum ASIC is presented using regular computers so what’s with the unnecessary duality? Likewise, why design a quantum chip to work like an x86 processor when they’re better off doing the intense quantum calculation set?



  10. Jan Willem v.d. Gronden on January 7, 2020 at 8:23 pm

    Occams razor?



  11. Raul A. Ocasio Gonzalez on January 7, 2020 at 8:24 pm

    In 1969 everyone though that before 2000 we will live in other planets, but we are very far from that. Quantum seems more like a dream than a fact, controlling energy at such deep details is kind of science fiction



  12. Deepak on January 7, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    boom



  13. swissgunner on January 7, 2020 at 8:26 pm

    one, zero or both. Wa?



  14. Phuc Baldr on January 7, 2020 at 8:27 pm

    My brain 🧠 is a quantum computer



  15. End Times on January 7, 2020 at 8:29 pm

    Sounds more human than a computer.



  16. Mark Jacobson on January 7, 2020 at 8:36 pm

    Humans are determined to build a machine that will tell them the answers to their questions about the meaning of life. Humans will build a super computer that does appear to do this. and they will fall down and worship their god. (What’s really going on is that we are manifesting what is in our hearts. Machine evolution is a powerful thing, but in comparison to spiritual/biological evolution it is an ephemeral, diluted imitation.)



  17. Ken on January 7, 2020 at 8:37 pm

    2:14 Both of these things are true at the same time, and you need to use quantum mechanics to explain it. Ain’t that convenient.



  18. Tidepool Clipper on January 7, 2020 at 8:38 pm

    They will have to find a way to stop the quantum computers from LITERALLY exploding.

    Otherwise, they will mostly remain restricted to businesses until then.



  19. Zbigniew Brezinsky on January 7, 2020 at 8:42 pm

    One in 10 to the 20 is much greater than one in 100; 10 and 5 % respectively !
    Are you kidding !?



  20. Simplify! on January 7, 2020 at 8:43 pm

    Very clear!!



  21. nagualdesign on January 7, 2020 at 8:43 pm

    It’s a bizarre idea, for sure. The power of digital computers arguably derives from their binary nature; bits are either 1 or 0 (on or off) and telling the difference between the two states is a trivial matter. We could make ‘trinary’ computers or any number of possible states, or even make fully analogue computers, but we soon learned that sticking with two states and keeping any noise to an absolute minimum is the best way to build things if you want to really ramp up the clock speed.

    Quantum computers, on the other hand, seem to thrive on ambiguity of sorts (superposition) but that necessarily means noise. I can’t see how we’re ever going to separate the two. A perfect qbit would be one that you never look at, which is completely useless, and QEC seems to fly in the face of the whole idea of quantum computing.



  22. Hugo Sjövall on January 7, 2020 at 8:44 pm

    This guy is so great at explaining!



  23. Arthur Geier on January 7, 2020 at 8:50 pm

    Prove it.



  24. T D on January 7, 2020 at 8:51 pm

    F



  25. Dennis on January 7, 2020 at 8:52 pm

    indeed cya in 50 years



  26. Alberto González Téllez on January 7, 2020 at 8:52 pm

    Universal quantum computers that highly overcome classical computers in many practical areas are certainly not around the corner, but NISQ (Noisy Intermediate Size Quantum) computers are already here. They mainly serve to emulate quantum mechanical systems, "eventually" this can speed-up very significantly improvement on quantum technology shortening the path to quantum advantage in other fields.



  27. lazer tag on January 7, 2020 at 8:56 pm

    this is why apple sucks.. they dont progress anything.. they dont invest in future tech.. they just copy and make it look pretty for apple lemings to over pay



  28. Francesco Rizzo on January 7, 2020 at 9:01 pm

    The 70 years from 1946 to 2017 cannot be compared to the timespan from 2017 to 2021. Now things proceed faster, and scientists can exchange information using internet, and there are big companies that can make big investments in QC (any computing corporation in 1946?). Also, you can perform the same calculation multiple times so you reduce the risk of error.



  29. Rocky on January 7, 2020 at 9:01 pm

    its basically statistics and probability with theory on how it works.



  30. L cook on January 7, 2020 at 9:03 pm

    Use crystals to isolate them.



  31. Graham S on January 7, 2020 at 9:06 pm

    Sound like it will create a quantum instruction set without the need for any binary conversion.