How quantum computers work | Cătălina Curceanu | TEDxCluj

How quantum computers work | Cătălina Curceanu | TEDxCluj

Atoms behave quite strange. But we have a theory about that now. The quantum theory. Anyone who is not shocked by it, does not understand it. But why does this matter? The quantum computers can help us fight the problems we face today. By exploring how nature and the universe work.
Cătălina Curceanu is a researcher of “impossible atoms” As Head Researcher of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, she deals with the planning and management of experiments of nuclear and hadronic physics in Italy’s National Laboratories of Gran Sasso.
As the 2016 prize recipient of the “Women in Physics Lecturer” awarded by the Australian Institute of Physics, she received her doctorate in research in the field of spectroscopic meson physics in the OBELIX (CERN) experiment. For this work, she received the prestigious, scientific prize awarded by the Romanian Academy in Rome.
Cătălina Curceanu is a researcher of “impossible atoms” As Head Researcher of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, she deals with the planning and management of experiments of nuclear and hadronic physics in Italy’s National Laboratories of Gran Sasso.

As the 2016 prize recipient of the “Women in Physics Lecturer” awarded by the Australian Institute of Physics, she received her doctorate in research in the field of spectroscopic meson physics in the OBELIX (CERN) experiment. For this work, she received the prestigious, scientific prize awarded by the Romanian Academy in Rome.

Cătălina Curceanu is a researcher of “impossible atoms” As Head Researcher of the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, she deals with the planning and management of experiments of nuclear and hadronic physics in Italy’s National Laboratories of Gran Sasso.

As the 2016 prize recipient of the “Women in Physics Lecturer” awarded by the Australian Institute of Physics, she received her doctorate in research in the field of spectroscopic meson physics in the OBELIX (CERN) experiment. For this work, she received the prestigious, scientific prize awarded by the Romanian Academy in Rome. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

7 Comments

  1. Siddhu on January 13, 2020 at 8:36 pm

    Awsome presentation

  2. Sofyan Tsauri on January 13, 2020 at 8:52 pm

    very well presented, thank you mrs Catalina

  3. murat birol on January 13, 2020 at 8:54 pm

    I did not like the music, maybe it is just me. Music takes the topic and dematerilizes everything for me, breaks my focus. I’m all for it when there is music in dcumentaries like Cosmos but in a tiny presentation like this this feels incoherent, unfocusing, and insincere. Other than the music i like how this is explained, Professor was most impressive. Music just makes it hard to get 7 minutes mark.

  4. Lucian Constantinescu on January 13, 2020 at 9:03 pm

    Why engleză?

  5. Alberto González Téllez on January 13, 2020 at 9:06 pm

    Quantum Computing is MUSIC

  6. Anogoya Dagaati on January 13, 2020 at 9:06 pm

    The musical accompaniment was beautiful and a great compliment!

  7. Blues Man 63 on January 13, 2020 at 9:14 pm

    Russian classical music? Give me a break….

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